Forsyth Sheriff’s Office Offers Program to Reduce Teen Auto Accidents

Forsyth Sheriff’s Office Offers Program to Reduce Teen Auto Accidents

The Forsyth County Sheriff’s Office is set to once again offer a safety program aimed at teaching teen drivers lasting lessons that will avert them from causing dangerous auto accidents, Forsyth County News reports.

Read More: Auto Accident Attorney in Georgia

Sheriff’s Telling Our Parents and Promoting Educated Drivers, also known as STOPPED, is a law enforcement-centered program that has been offered in Forsyth County since 2014, after several years of dormancy surrounding the program.

The way it works is parents of drivers under the age of 18 sign up and receive a decal containing contact and vehicle information that is placed on the windshield. If a teen driver is pulled over by a Forsyth County sheriff’s deputy in a vehicle carrying that decal, the deputy completes a notification card that is sent home to the parents, notifying them what the teen did wrong and what he or she can do in the future to curtail dangerous driving habits.

STOPPED was originally developed by the sheriff’s office in Onondaga County, New York, and has been implemented by law enforcement agencies across the country, including Georgia. The program is completely free and has been described by FCSO Corporal Robin Regan as “proven” in reducing the number of crashes involving teen drivers.

Regan says that, for Forsyth County law enforcement, the goal of STOPPED is to “keep parent informed, reduce teen crashes, and build stronger relationships with the community.”

A teenager behind the wheel of a car can be a scary thought for a concerned parent, but it is also a statistical danger across the U.S.

TeenDriverSource.org reports that auto accidents are the leading cause of death for American teens. Also, data indicates that 16-19 year olds are more likely to experience a wreck than any other age group, a fact that puts teens and those on the roads around them in jeopardy.

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